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Sustainable Living: Innovative Ways To Grow Your Own Food!

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Sustainable Living: Innovative Ways To Grow Your Own Food!

The word, Hydroponic, comes from Latin and means working water. Simply put, it is the art of growing plants without soil.

When most people think of hydroponics, they think of plants grown with their roots suspended directly into water with no growing medium. This is just one type of hydroponic gardening known as N.F.T. (nutrient film technique). There are several variations of N.F.T. used around the world and it is a very popular method of growing hydroponically. What most people don’t realize is that there are countless methods and variations of hydroponic gardening.

If you give a plant exactly what it needs, when it needs it, in the amount that it needs, the plant will be as healthy as is genetically possible. With hydroponics this is an easy task; in soil it is far more difficult.

With hydroponics the plants are grown in an inert growing medium and a perfectly balanced, pH adjusted nutrient solution is delivered to the roots in a highly soluble form. This allows the plant to uptake its food with very little effort as opposed to soil where the roots must search out the nutrients and extract them. This is true even when using rich, organic soil and top of the line nutrients. The energy expended by the roots in this process is energy better spent on vegetative growth and fruit and flower production.

If you grow two genetically identical plants using soil for one and hydroponics for the other, you will almost immediately see the difference this factor makes. Faster, better growth and much greater yields are just some of the many reasons that hydroponics is being adapted around the world for commercial food production as well as a growing number of home, hobby gardeners.

In the other hand, aquaponics is the marriage of aquaculture (raising fish) and hydroponics (the soil-less growing of plants) that grows fish and plants together in one integrated system. The fish waste provides an organic food source for the growing plants and the plants provide a natural filter for the water the fish live in. The third participants are the microbes (nitrifying bacteria) and composting red worms that thrive in the growing media. They do the job of converting the ammonia from the fish waste first into nitrites, then into nitrates and the solids into vermicompost that that are food for the plants.

In combining both systems aquaponics capitalizes on the benefits and eliminates the drawbacks of each.

For more information on aquaponics and hydroponics visit:
Get to know aquaponics: http://www.backyardaquaponics.com/
What is aquaponics: http://theaquaponicsource.com/what-is-aquaponics/
What is hydroponics: http://www.simplyhydro.com/whatis.htm
Hydroponics at Home and for Beginners: http://www.instructables.com/id/Hydroponics—at-Home-and-for-Beginners/

Comments

seawolf then and now says:

i live in the country, where i dont have access to a market

Gary Graham says:

"5 types of lettuce grows in one hole" OH GOD NO

Gary Graham says:

"Water's is in My Blood" Duh

Christina Park says:

I want to grow plants indoors but I'm scared of bringing in insects. Does it attract insects?

jAM Ab says:

realy wow !

prashant kumar says:

hey beautiful lady ,can u forward the instructions on my gmail id gagirishi@gmail

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