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How Our Winter Garden Survived -23°F (-31°C) With No Heat

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Please join me for an update on our winter garden after a week of subzero temperatures and a low of -23°F (-31°C).

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Highlights:
0:22 How we protected plants from the cold
0:22 Didn’t remove snow from north wall and bottom of hoop house
0:50 Covered outside and inside of door with 6 mil greenhouse film
1:52 Why I did not use supplemental heat
2:23 Covered cold frame and low tunnels with 2 extra layers of 6 mil greenhouse film (5 layers of cover total)
3:42 Temperatures outside versus hoop house
4:34 How did the plants hold up to the extreme cold?
6:50 The plants we’re growing are more cold hardy than most people think

Oscar Cameos:
4:14 4:34 6:21 8:16

I’m passionate about an approach to organic gardening that is frugal, easy, sustainable, and works with nature to achieve amazing results. My videos will help you grow more healthy organic fruits and vegetables, while working less and saving money. I don’t push gardening products. I don’t hype bogus “garden secrets”. I provide evidence based strategies to help you grow a lot of food on a little land without spending much or working harder than you have to!

Comments

OYR Frugal & Sustainable Organic Gardening says:

If you shop on Amazon, you can support OYR simply by clicking this link (bookmark it too) before shopping: http://www.amazon.com/?tag=oneya-20

Highlights:
0:22 How we protected plants from the cold

0:22 Didn't remove snow from north wall and bottom of hoop house

0:50 Covered outside and inside of door with 6 mil greenhouse film

1:52 Why I did not use supplemental heat

2:23 Covered cold frame and low tunnels with 2 extra layers of 6 mil greenhouse film (5 layers of cover total)

3:42 Temperatures outside versus hoop house

4:34 How did the plants hold up to the extreme cold?

6:50 The plants we're growing are more cold hardy than most people think

Oscar Cameos:

4:14 4:34 6:21 8:16

Tiariana Manna says:

It is quite amazing 🤗

JoeysAmazingThings says:

Amazing job! Please make more videos and try experimenting with other types of plants. I used to have needle nose palms near Buffalo.)

Proverbs31 Woman says:

How do you water?

Julie Gogola says:

I have a 12 X 8 greenhouse that I just got this past July. I have 2, 50 gallon barrels, they are actually a bit more than 50 gallon, I painted them black to help with "thermal mass" in winter, BUT, I also have a small 2 X4 mini greenhouse inside my greenhouse, and I have put a set of C-9 lights inside the mini shelter and they are NOT LED lights, so, they throw off a good bit of heat. I have a Windmill palm and some Live oak acorns sown in pots in the shelter. It seems to add 10 F of heat inside the shelter. I have another set of lights for when it gets REALLY cold. I bought a small room size heater, BUT, maybe I will NOT need it. I MAY be able to grow some semi- tropicals inside the little shelter, BUT< I am still just seeing how much heat I can get out of the C-9 lights. The C-9 lights that Are NOT LED's are hard to find. I have bought mine at Home Depot. I think that I will go and buy several justin case they stop having them.

Timothy Black says:

Fantastic channel! 🙂

From an engineering perspective, i'm not clear on a few things. First, gorilla tape would be fine as a way to run power through plastic film, however you have soil under your hoop house, so you could just bury a 2" PVC pipe, plus a bit of ordinary duct tape on both sides, and there you go. You could easily run a small heater and a small fan.

Secondly, you could do your hoop house with truss frames, and apply a layer of plastic to the inside as well. That would give you something like a 4" trapped air gap, which would give some R value.

Thirdly, you could cover the inside half of the northern wall with Mylar film. This would act as a radiant barrier, and would reflect more sunlight into the inside of your hoop house.

These three things combined would keep your internal temperature much more consistent, and with a small space heater you could keep the temp from going anywhere near freezing. This might allow you to grow more than just greens in the winter.

Great work mate! Enjoying your content, and I hope my words are helpful!

dion759 says:

Why not double line the walls of the green house. Line the inside of the frame

B Charron says:

Did you harvest these throughout the winter? I want to grow cold hardy veggies in a non heated tunnel greenhouse that I can harvest from all winter long. I live in growing zone 5. Do you think its possible for me to do this without having to cover up so much like you did in this video so i can easily access the veggies each day to consume?

666Thief says:

what about the light plants need?

Bill Jones says:

At what temp should we first cover our raised bed in the Fall? Getting 65 F days & 40 F nights? Will I cook them if I cover too soon? In Indiana

J Curtis says:

How often are uncovering them to get sun? How often do you water during the cold months

James Benedict says:

Do plants need irrigation in the sealed green house? If so, what method did you use? how often do you irrigate? I am seriously thinking about building such green house. I can use all the tips I can get. Thank you for posting!!

countrieboyz2009 says:

I've been wondering what I could grow in the winter here in NC (lows typically around 15 f at night) but we don't eat alot of greens (lettuce, kale, etc) which is what's holding us back.

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